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Dec 15, 2020

Milestone for $120m big battery project

Milestone for $120m big battery project

Vena Energy Australia has achieved financial close for the $120 million Wandoan South battery energy storage system (BESS).

This milestone follows the 15-year deal signed by AGL for full operational dispatch rights for what will be Queensland’s biggest battery, and the second largest in Australia, Vena says.

ING Australia will be financing the project.

Construction of the project commenced in October, with the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contract awarded to Doosan GridTech Australia.

The workforce is expected to peak at 70 during the 12-month construction program.

“We are delighted to be delivering the first stage of Vena Energy’s Wandoan South Project in the Western Downs region of south-west Queensland,” Vena Energy Australia head Anil Nangia said.

“The Wandoan South BESS represents the first milestone of Vena Energy’s overarching Wandoan South Project, approved to generate up to 650 MW of solar electricity, and 450 MW of energy storage across several stages”.

The BESS will be capable of discharging up to 100 megawatts and storing 150 megawatt hours of energy, equivalent to powering up to 57,000 Australian homes.

Doosan GridTech Australia general manager Adrian Marziano said the BESS would be controlled by Doosan’s DG-IC control system.

“The controller is the intelligence of the BESS system, allowing for the coordination of complex schedules and operating modes within the facility’s system platform,” Mr Marziano said.

AGL chief operating officer Markus Brokhof said that AGL was very pleased that financial close had been achieved on this 100 MW/ 150 MWh battery.

“As part of our agreement, AGL will have full operational dispatch rights once it begins operating in 2021, providing critical support to our growing portfolio of energy storage assets,” Mr Brokhof said.

“Grid-scale batteries like Wandoan South BESS allow AGL to leverage excess solar and wind generation in Queensland while providing capacity when renewable sources are not generating.”

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